Shibari double column tie
Double column tie securing two legs together

Some common ties used in Shibari rope bondage.

This post follows on from An Introduction to Japanese Rope Bondage, (otherwise known as Shibari), contributed by guest writer Stutographer. It describes some of his preferred rope bondage techniques, and safety aspects to consider.

There are many different types of ties in Shibari. Some of the most important and versatile to tie are column ties. These ties are so-called because looking at the human body, it translates as the arms, legs and torso representing columns.

Column ties

A single column tie is designed to tie a ‘single column,’ i.e. a limb to something else. The rope goes around your wrist or ankle, and the other end around a bedpost, for example. Indeed this tie is ideal for tying your partner in a spread eagle position. The versatility of a single column tie to lead your partner around or to place them into various positions is quite amazing. When tying, the limb is not tied directly to the post and there should be a little slack in the rope allowing for movement. Also to relieve the pressure on the area being restrained.

 

Shibari single column tie of wrist
Single column tie of the wrist

As with a lot of skills you’ll learn in life there is more than one way to do so. Tying a single column with rope is no exception! I personally prefer to use a zip snare, as it’s simpler to tie. Moreover from a photographic / aesthetic point of view I think zip snares look neater. The end that goes around the limb can be tied in advance, thus saving time.  Also, from a safety point of view, the knot itself doesn’t tighten or collapse against the limb if you or your partner struggle during play.

 

Shibari zip snare
A zip snare tie

A double column tie is another versatile, widely-used restraint technique in Shibari rope bondage. As it goes by various names, you may hear it referred to as a Niwatori (meaning little chicken) or as a Kani (crab). The terminology depends on how it is used to tie a partner. A double column tie is used to tie two ‘columns’ together. For example:

  • both wrists together.
  • Both ankles together
  • Wrist to thigh.
  • To tie a limb to a piece of furniture, i.e. arm of a chair, or a partner’s leg to that of a chair.
Shibari double cloumn tie
Ankle tied to chair leg using a  double column tie

As you practise tying the double column tie, it is important that you are aware of how snug the tie will be between the two ‘columns.’ You’ll want to avoid pinching your partner’s skin when restraining more delicate areas!

Again, there are various methods to attempt a double column tie. If I’m tying two limbs together I like to use a Bowswain’s handcuff. It’s a variation on the zip snare mentioned above and like that tie, it too can be prepared in advance. However, when I’m tying myself or someone else to a chair, a simple double column tie will suffice, as shown above.

 

Keeping Shibari safe, sane and consensual

Before you begin to practise Shibari with a new partner, it’s imperative to discuss what you both are into. Not to mention any hard limits that are a no-go! Accept that each of you may have different preferences and work together on techniques where you share a common interest.

For me personally, I find tying someone creates an incredible sense of closeness and intimacy. Seeing the effect that being tied up has on them is a joy to behold. I have to admit, I find it extremely erotic.

Pleasure is good, pain is not always!

Health issues will need consideration to an extent; allergies as well as joint issues, past injuries and circulatory problems can all impact on rope play. This doesn’t mean you cannot try Shibari, just that you have to take extra care while doing it. There may be certain ties you’ll need to leave out altogether, or adapt others to suit. For example, I have old fractures in my back and three anterior wedged vertebra. I have to be careful when self-tying that I don’t over stretch. I take care not to tie too tight across my back, as it can inflame my muscles making them sore the next day.

You should also be aware of where to place restraints on yourself / your partner. Stay away from areas such as the front of the neck, and don’t tie directly to joints as this could cause circulation and nerve damage. The best places to tie are around the major muscle groups such as the torso, forearms, lower legs and thighs. Everybody’s anatomy is slightly different, so what suits one will not necessarily suit another. When being restrained,  if something feels ‘off’, including any sensation of tingling, pinching or pain, trust your instincts and stop!

Before I go, the take-home safety message is: always have a pair of safety shears to hand when tying. These are the funny ‘flat scissors’ you find in first-aid packs. They easily cut through rope, and have a rounded edge so as not to cut the skin. In addition, keep yourself hydrated, and as with other styles of bondage, ensure you have a safe-word, that either partner can use at any time.

 

Other techniques involved in Shibari

I hope you have enjoyed reading this brief look at some ties I enjoy practising. There are many more types including, Futomoto (‘Fat Leg’), hogties, and armbinders, as well as suspension ties. If you fancy trying out some Shibari yourself please take a moment to check out the websites below. Most have videos especially the YouTube sites, which helps you see exactly how to tie. They will give you tips on ties, in addition to more in-depth information on safety and rope care. If you like what you see you could always check if there are classes near you. Fetlife sometimes have rope ‘munches’ you can pop along to.

About luvbunnysl82

Check Also

Boudoir Club

A reader’s experience at Swingers clubs

Recently I had a Twitter poll to canvas my readers’ thoughts on adult parties /swingers …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: